Echo Sierra

Thoughts on Conflicts, Peace and Defence policies

Posted by Echo Sierra On December - 20 - 2012 0 Comment

In Focus published a new blog entry regarding civil war in Syria. The conflict is to enter its third year on March 2013 and, as Thomas Friedman* reported, some insurgents believe it might last five more years at least.

Whilst Western governments and administrations worry about potential chemical weapons detained by the regime and stress that their use might trigger an intervention, some fear that such a basis for intervention might describe a short-term policy towards the Syrian conflict:

“If I wasn’t so in love with the whole democracy thing, I’d ask why we didn’t just focus more on regional stability and leave considerations of western style human rights and democracy as awkward details for someone else to think about [...] Current Syria has never really been on our side, a new Syria is almost guaranteed not to be. We need to think in old-school terms about containment and stability, and less about the schadenfreude of giving someone a kick who we have thought of as a pain.” -  by Rob Dover, Moral vacuums and chemical weapons

In an interview given to the Lebanese newspaper al-Akhbar (pro Syrian), Vice-President of Syria, Faruk al-Chareh, told that “no insurgency can end the battle from a military point of view. Like security forces’ operations and military units will not end the battle“. He thus called for a “historic agreement” between parties and said “[Syrians] have to defend Syria’s existence and not conduct a battle for a man or a regime“. Mr al-Chareh, who have allegedly been pushed aside, explained that: “Assad keeps all powers [...] But there are diverging opinions and points of view within the Syrian command. However, they have not reached the point of being qualified as tendencies or deep breaches“.

You can access In Focus’ selection by clicking the picture below:

 Smoke rises in the Hanano and Bustan al-Basha districts in the northern city of Aleppo as fighting continued through the night, on December 1, 2012. A large rebel force launched an offensive on one of the few army bases in northwestern Syria still in the hands of loyalist forces and as fighting near Damascus closed the main road to the airport. (Javier Manzano/AFP/Getty Images)

Smoke rises in the Hanano and Bustan al-Basha districts in the northern city of Aleppo as fighting continued through the night, on December 1, 2012. A large rebel force launched an offensive on one of the few army bases in northwestern Syria still in the hands of loyalist forces and as fighting near Damascus closed the main road to the airport. (Javier Manzano/AFP/Getty Images) Smoke rises in the Hanano and Bustan al-Basha districts in the northern city of Aleppo as fighting continued through the night, on December 1, 2012. A large rebel force launched an offensive on one of the few army bases in northwestern Syria still in the hands of loyalist forces and as fighting near Damascus closed the main road to the airport. (Javier Manzano/AFP/Getty Images)

 

*: by the way, I advise you read his latest column about Russia’s prospects: Pussy Riots, Tupac and Putin. It reminds me of a 2008 conference, gathering representatives from the Russian oil & gas industry and from European energy providers. Whilst the trends behind the presentations were “find us outlets!” & “secure our supply!“, one astute panelist rose the question: “What about Russia’s economy once its gas and oil reserves are drained?


This site is using OpenAvatar based on