Echo Sierra

Thoughts on Conflicts, Peace and Defence policies

Posted by O J On February - 4 - 2013 0 Comment

The Big Picture has published an entry about Afghanistan recently. You will find link to this article further below.

The afghan peace process is currently being discussed between different stakeholders.  In December, Taleb and United Islamic Front representatives had met in France. Whilst gathering these representatives into the same room was a miracle, the meeting is unlikely to have positive outcomes in the medium term, given the profound opposition between both parties. Indeed, about the Karzai administration and the United States Taliban representatives said that:

Even now, they state one thing and do another. On the one hand they say that peace must be achieved and on the other, they add new people to the black list; they say that they will leave Afghanistan but sign strategic pacts in false hopes of prolonging their occupation. They are doing this despite being well informed that the Kabul administration can never represent the Afghan people but still bargain with them on the future of the Afghan nation

The statement illustrates how complex solving the Afghan conflict will be, and that a NATO withdrawal is unlikely to bring peace, unless governance issues are addressed, as senior member of the High Peace Council Mohammad Masoom Stanekzai says:

The purpose of the peace process is we want all Afghans to be part of the political system [...] This peace process should not just be a deal between a few people or between the government and the Taliban, but everybody should benefit from the peace process, and everybody should see a peaceful prospect for themselves for the future

In the meantime, the United Kingdom holds Afghan-Pakistani negotiations about the future cooperation between both parties regarding cross-border security and the engagement of Taliban. Yet, it remains to be seen if the multilayered Pakistani executive and administration are willing and able to snap off their unclear influence policy towards Afghanistan.

 You can click the image below to access The Big Picture’s selection:

An Afghan woman stands to receive winter supplies at a UNHCR distribution center for needy refugees at the Women's Garden in Kabul, Jan. 2, 2013. Hundreds of families living in makeshift shelters around the Afghan capital collected blankets, charcoal and other supplies as authorities struggle to avoid last year's deadly winter toll. With temperatures dropping to -10 Celsius (14 Fahrenheit) at night in the city, the 35,000 refugees who live in the snow-covered camps face a battle to survive dire conditions protected only by plastic sheeting. Despite Afghanistan receiving billions of dollars of aid since 2001, more than 100 children died last year during the harshest winter in two decades. (Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images)

An Afghan woman stands to receive winter supplies at a UNHCR distribution center for needy refugees at the Women’s Garden in Kabul, Jan. 2, 2013. Hundreds of families living in makeshift shelters around the Afghan capital collected blankets, charcoal and other supplies as authorities struggle to avoid last year’s deadly winter toll. With temperatures dropping to -10 Celsius (14 Fahrenheit) at night in the city, the 35,000 refugees who live in the snow-covered camps face a battle to survive dire conditions protected only by plastic sheeting. Despite Afghanistan receiving billions of dollars of aid since 2001, more than 100 children died last year during the harshest winter in two decades. (Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Update: Alan Taylor published its own entry about Afghanistan on In Focus, you can access the selection by clicking the picture below:

 An Afghan man stands outside a compound near the town of Hutal in Maywand District, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, January 20, 2013. (Reuters/Andrew Burton)

An Afghan man stands outside a compound near the town of Hutal in Maywand District, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, January 20, 2013. (Reuters/Andrew Burton)

 


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